Calling all Bloggers!

At the January 21st Management Council meeting, it was decided to do something with our blog. This blog was created to handle daily news from our simulation crew at the Mars Desert Research Station, Feb 26-Mar 11, 2006.

After the simulation was over, I tried to keep it going and for a time I was posting 2-5 times a month. Even that pace is insufficient to keep blog watchers interested.

In between there has, I believe, been one post by Charles Radley and another by James Rogers.

We are now actively looking for more bloggers.

Moon Society input to the Obama Transition Team on Space

At its January 14th meeting, the Moon Society Management Council, mindful that different members have different ideas about how the nation's space program could be better run and better targeted, has not as yet officially endorsed either of two position papers put together separately by Director of Project Development David A. Dunlop and by Chair of the Publicity and Outreach Committee, James A. Rogers.

Society Gears up for More Action with Project Teams

From Society President Peter Kokh
August 16, 2008

At the August 6th Management Council meeting in the moon-leaders room of the ASI-MOO online chat-room environment, in discussing recent major member-ship growth, the effect of aggressively pursued carefully thought out projects took center stage.

In the past two years, two projects in particular absorbed the lion’s share of Society leaders’ attention:

Reauthorizing the Vision for Space Exploration

On May 7, 2008, George Whitesides, Executive Director of our affiliate organization, The National Space Society, read a prepared comprehensive and in depth presentation on the future goals of the American Space Program before Congress.

His audience was a US Senate Subcommittee - the Subcommittee on Space, Aeronautics, and Related Sciences Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, which was having a special hearing on the subject.

Growing Plants on the Moon

A cool article Thursday April 17th titled Plants thrive on Moon rock diet. In short the scientists took crushed anorthosite a type of rock similar to rock on lunar surface and planted marigolds in it. The marigolds didn't do very well in the plain anorthosite. But in the anorthosite that they added bacteria to, the marigolds grew very well. Apparently the bacteria extracted minerals from the anorthosite such as phosphate that the plants were able to use.

Remembering Arthur C. Clarke

Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_C._Clarke

I grew up in the 1950s as an avid reader of science fiction. Right from the beginning, I took such a liking to stories by Arthur C. Clarke that I bought everything he put out.

Unlike many others, who fantasized about things impossible, Clarke always wrote with his slide rule in hand (prehistoric prototype of the calculator for all you young'uns out there who missed the good old days.) Everything he wrote had that tangible touch of realism.